Islam and International Criminal Justice

Islam and International Criminal Justice

 

Partly in response to growing focus on crimes committed in multiple conflicts in the Islamic world, and the debate on the politics of international justice that entangles multiple themes, the International Nuremberg Principles Academy organized a panel discussion as part of its annual forum held in Nuremberg Germany on 20-21 November 2015. The panel, which brought together several experts from the Muslim world considered the place of the Nuremberg principles, which undergird international criminal law, in the Islamic world. The panel focused mainly on theoretical issues surrounding the universality of the Nuremberg Principles, and was supplemented by a workshop that discussed the application of the Nuremberg principles in several case studies namely Lebanon, Iraq, Sudan and Iran. Encouraged by the robust debates on multiple themes that were nevertheless not treated adequately and exhaustively, the Nuremberg Academy plans to convene a roundtable of experts (Islamologists  and international criminal lawyers) to deliberate on the theoretical and practical concerns related to accountability for core international crimes in the Muslim world including ISIS (Syria, Iraq), Boko Haram (Nigeria), Libya, Syria, Lebanon and Afghanistan. On themes, experts will discuss the universality  and acceptance of international criminal justice in these settings as well as the appropriateness and role of local and global institutions designed to establish accountability for atrocity crimes. In addition, the moral, philosophical, and political justifications for, and challenges relating to the mounting of prosecutions for these crimes will be laid bare and debated. It is hoped that a seminal study on the question of accountability for international crimes in the Islamic world will emerge as key product of the deliberations.

Contact
Dr. Tallyn Gray
Tallyn.Gray@stadt.nuernberg.de